Body-language and nonverbal communication

Archive
Tag "suicide"

stock-market-crash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock market crash or when money kills you

The stock market in China is eroding. People loose ever so much money in ever such a short period of time.

Nearly a quarter of investors say that the value of their investments has fallen by more than 50 percent since the beginning of the year amid falling stock prices. 23.8 percent of the 42,000 people polled by sina said that they “had suffered a loss of over 50 percent and dare not check their accounts”.

Investors and bankers feared already since some months that this would happen soon in China. It is a stock bubble which seems to explode.

Its not my interest to analyse this. I am not the expert for this. But I am an expert for human relationship and communication. Let me tell you first a very personal story. When we …………..

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old people suicid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When grandma kills herself….

One result of the speedy urbanisation is the dramatically increasing suicide of old people. Three times as much as members of other social Groups kill themselves i said by Chinese scientists recently stated. Professor He Xuefeng from the TU Huazhong in Hubei states that the suicide of old People really is big  and even growing problem or better to say dilemma in China.

Younger people leave the rural areas for ………..

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Change of households in China

Chinese families become smaller and smaller. The number of one-person-households grows instead rapidly. This is due to the low birth-rate and a changed attitude towards marriage.

The National Committee on Health and Family-planning states that the average of …………….

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Lowest suicide rate in the world

In 2002 the Lancet, a British medical journal, said there were 23.2 suicides per 100,000 people annually from 1995 to 1999. This year a report by a group of researchers from the University of Hong Kong found that had declined to an average annual rate of 9.8 per 100,000 for the years 2009-11, a 58% drop.

Paul Yip, director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong and a co-author of the recent study, says no ……..

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Test stress leading cause of suicide

According to the Annual Report on China’s Education (2014), or the Blue Book of Education, released on Tuesday, most of the teenagers who killed themselves are in middle school, and they did so mainly because they could not bear the heavy pressure of the test-oriented education system. Read more……

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2014-05/14/content_17505294.htm

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A suicide selfie

A young Chinese girl committed suicide after a very problematic relationship, as she posted for several times. She could not stand this relationship on her own only, so she opened up to the virtual public and let everybody take part in her relationship.

And also take part in her suicide. While sitting on a very high building she took a selfie which lets believe, so the Chinese media, that this is her last selfie. She at the same time posted: “After I’m dead, I will haunt you day and night, I will never be apart from you again.”

I think that there is a very deep desperation and anger ……….

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Shame and psychotherapy in Chinese culture

The Chinese character of shame has two radicals: an ear on the left; and a stop on the right. Literally, anything you don’t want others to hear would be shameful. Shame can be distinguished from guilt: a total self-failure vis-à-vis a standard produces shame, while a specific self-failure results in guilt.1 The universal view of shame states that shame is one of the quintessential human emotions and feelings of shame are the same cross-culturally, which makes a lot of sense to me. Chinese culture values individuals who have a sense of shame, who know right from wrong and who have an awareness of falling short of a standard. In Western society it is not socially desirable to be shameless either, though what brings it about could be quite different. Culture plays a significant role in what precipitates shame, how shame is expressed and handled.

Thus, what is normal in one culture could be viewed as shameful in another. For example, sending aging parents with dementia to a nursing home for Chinese American caregivers is often viewed as something shameful as it violates the Confucian value of filial piety. Chinese families tend to rely heavily on family resources and …………………….

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More relevant factors of psychotherapy in China

Family (fealty) and the one-child policy: Family has always been strong in China and from an early age, family loyalty is seen as crucial to survival in the future, as one generation relies on the next for support in old age or infirmity. The one-child policy has dramatically affected the Chinese people’s experience and the lives of families. Under the one-child policy there comes an increased insecurity amongst the elderly and the young alike. Parents put enormous pressure on this one child from an early age to conform to educational expectations, moral responsibility, and the work ethic. In the past, maybe five or six children would have shared the burden, but today that is no longer true; single children feel the increasing need to make a success of life in order to care for their parents later. Cousins become brothers and sisters, which is an adaptive social support, but they cannot share the parental burden as each has their own.

The one-child rule is not rigid: one can have more than one child, but the state only recognises the first child as the recipient of state benefits and schooling freedom. Additional children become a financial burden to the parents. Girls are not appreciated in the family in the same way ………………

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Confuzius, family life, industrial revolution and the body

Probably you know it already, this kind of family orientated society and culture is closely bound to moralism. This is based on the old Confuzian tradition which requests a lot from the person concerning it´s daily life, it´s social behavior and the manner how one relates to one another.

So it is not a surprise that people in China try to control themselves and obey social and cultural norms. Furthermore they try to respect others whom they are related to and take care of people who are of interest to them. In addition to this “they develop and maintain interpersonal relationship ( guan xi ) with modest and polite attitude”.

To make it short: continues practices of this Confuzian habit to live …………………..

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