Body-language and nonverbal communication

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Tag "parents"

2 child policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The impact of the two child-policy on social Dynamics in China

The Chinese government changes its political strategy of family-planning. From now on a family is allowed to have two children.

Of course this is a big change and many families are happy about this. And yet there are four big challenges which have to be faced in China.

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kneelto-parents-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Never disobey or: surrender to submission

Parents usually love their children and children love their parents. Of course there are different ways of showing and expressing your love.

And yet something happened some weeks ago in China I really could not understand. It’s sad that young students make a Kowtow to their parents for their first day of primary school. It’s sad that the children were made to show their gratitude towards their parents and teachers in ways that struck some observers as shameful and old-fashioned.

Well there are differences…..      

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Helplessness towards psychic problems in China

China with more than 1 Billion inhabitants only has about 25-35.000 psychiatrists and psychotherapists. Compared to other countries this is for too less to guarantee a good health-management and mental health system. For example in Germany there are even more psychiatrists and psycho-therapists for only 85 Million inhabitants.

This leads to significant and severe problems within in the population. People don’t know how to react………

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Shame and psychotherapy in Chinese culture

The Chinese character of shame has two radicals: an ear on the left; and a stop on the right. Literally, anything you don’t want others to hear would be shameful. Shame can be distinguished from guilt: a total self-failure vis-à-vis a standard produces shame, while a specific self-failure results in guilt.1 The universal view of shame states that shame is one of the quintessential human emotions and feelings of shame are the same cross-culturally, which makes a lot of sense to me. Chinese culture values individuals who have a sense of shame, who know right from wrong and who have an awareness of falling short of a standard. In Western society it is not socially desirable to be shameless either, though what brings it about could be quite different. Culture plays a significant role in what precipitates shame, how shame is expressed and handled.

Thus, what is normal in one culture could be viewed as shameful in another. For example, sending aging parents with dementia to a nursing home for Chinese American caregivers is often viewed as something shameful as it violates the Confucian value of filial piety. Chinese families tend to rely heavily on family resources and …………………….

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